Neurotransmitter Transporters as Molecular Targets for Addictive Drugs

Drug Alcohol Depend. Jun-Jul 1998;51(1-2):87-96. doi: 10.1016/s0376-8716(98)00068-4.

Abstract

The neurotransmitter dopamine lies at or near the center of current theories of drug abuse and dependence. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that dopaminergic cells play key roles in a variety of motivated behaviors. Accordingly, it is not surprising that cocaine and amphetamines--some of the most widely used illicit drugs--elevate extraneuronal dopamine concentrations through their actions on the plasma membrane dopamine transporter. From the point of view of developing novel pharmacological interventions for the treatment or prevention of psychostimulant abuse, practical benefits may arise from an improved understanding of how neurotransmitter transporters operate and how drugs interact with them.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Amphetamines / pharmacology
  • Animals
  • Biogenic Monoamines / metabolism*
  • Carrier Proteins / chemistry
  • Carrier Proteins / drug effects*
  • Carrier Proteins / genetics
  • Carrier Proteins / metabolism
  • Central Nervous System Stimulants / pharmacology*
  • Cocaine / pharmacology
  • Dopamine / metabolism
  • Humans
  • Illicit Drugs / pharmacology*
  • Ion Transport / physiology
  • Membrane Potentials / physiology
  • Membrane Proteins / chemistry
  • Membrane Proteins / drug effects
  • Membrane Proteins / genetics
  • Membrane Proteins / metabolism
  • Mice
  • Mice, Knockout
  • Narcotics / pharmacology
  • Serotonin / metabolism
  • Structure-Activity Relationship
  • Synaptic Membranes
  • Synaptic Vesicles / drug effects

Substances

  • Amphetamines
  • Biogenic Monoamines
  • Carrier Proteins
  • Central Nervous System Stimulants
  • Illicit Drugs
  • Membrane Proteins
  • Narcotics
  • Serotonin
  • Cocaine
  • Dopamine