Tuberculosis and HIV infection: a global perspective

Respiration. 1998;65(5):335-42. doi: 10.1159/000029291.

Abstract

The incidence of HIV-associated tuberculosis has been increasing worldwide since the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, and is expected to increase even further during the foreseeable future, especially in developing countries. There is no doubt now that, in the presence of HIV infection, new-onset tuberculous infection progresses rapidly to clinically significant disease and the likelihood that latent tuberculous infection progresses rapidly to clinically significant disease and the likelihood that latent tuberculous infection will reactivate is enormously increased. The accelerating and amplifying influence of HIV infection is contributing to the increasing incidence of disease caused by multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Neither clinical features nor radiographic abnormalities reliably distinguish the majority of patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis from those without HIV infection. Some persons with HIV infection, however, present with atypical manifestations of tuberculosis and these patients may be difficult to diagnose. Six months of daily or thrice weekly chemotherapy with the usual regimen of 4 then 2 antituberculosis drugs cures most patients, but many die during or after treatment of other AIDS-related complications.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections*
  • HIV Infections / complications*
  • HIV-1*
  • Humans
  • Tuberculosis / complications*