Trabeculectomy with releasable sutures: a prospective, randomized pilot study

Arch Ophthalmol. 1998 Oct;116(10):1288-93. doi: 10.1001/archopht.116.10.1288.

Abstract

Objective: To compare the short-term and long-term efficacy of using releasable sutures vs conventional interrupted sutures for scleral flap suturing in trabeculectomy.

Design: A prospective randomized study.

Setting: A university-affiliated referral eye hospital.

Patients: Thirty consecutive patients requiring trabeculectomy for uncontrolled primary glaucoma.

Intervention: Fifteen patients underwent trabeculectomy with permanent interrupted sutures; the same number underwent trabeculectomy with releasable sutures.

Main outcome measures: Incidence of short-term shallowing of anterior chamber or hypotony and related complications, and long-term intraocular pressure control and bleb score.

Results: The mean percentage reduction in intraocular pressure on day 1 in the group with releasable sutures was 55.2%, while only a 0.8% reduction in anterior chamber depth was noted. This compared with figures of 59.3% and 10.1%, respectively, in the group without releasable sutures. Hypotony (intraocular pressure < or =6 mm Hg) was noted in 8 (53%) of cases without releasable sutures and 3 (20%) of cases with releasable sutures. Shallow anterior chamber (central anterior chamber depth, < or =1 mm) was noted in 5 (33%) of cases without releasable sutures and 1 (7%) of cases with releasable sutures. The mean +/- SD final bleb score was 5.4 +/- 0.3 in the group with releasable sutures compared with 4.2 +/- 0.6 in the group without releasable sutures (P<.001). The mean +/- SD final intraocular pressure at the end of 12 months was 16.9 +/- 1.2 mm Hg in the group without releasable sutures and 15.0 +/- 0.9 mm Hg in the group with releasable sutures (P<.001). Final intraocular pressure was controlled (intraocular pressure < or =21 mm Hg) in all patients in the group with releasable sutures, giving a success rate of 100%, and in 12 patients in the group without releasable sutures, giving a success rate of 80%.

Conclusions: Use of releasable sutures is an effective way at no extra cost or instrumentation to maximize the long-term bleb score and lower intraocular pressure, and to minimize the short-term complications of trabeculectomy.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Comparative Study
  • Randomized Controlled Trial

MeSH terms

  • Anterior Chamber / pathology
  • Female
  • Glaucoma, Angle-Closure / surgery*
  • Glaucoma, Open-Angle / surgery*
  • Humans
  • Intraocular Pressure
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Pilot Projects
  • Postoperative Complications
  • Prospective Studies
  • Suture Techniques*
  • Trabeculectomy / methods*
  • Treatment Outcome