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2007 1
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2021 0
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Emotion regulation and culture: are the social consequences of emotion suppression culture-specific?
Butler EA, Lee TL, Gross JJ. Butler EA, et al. Emotion. 2007 Feb;7(1):30-48. doi: 10.1037/1528-3542.7.1.30. Emotion. 2007. PMID: 17352561
Emotional suppression has been associated with generally negative social consequences (Butler et al., 2003; Gross & John, 2003). A cultural perspective suggests, however, that these consequences may be moderated by cultural values. ...These deleterious effects w …
Emotional suppression has been associated with generally negative social consequences (Butler et al., 2003; Gross & John, 2003). A cu
Does Expressing Your Emotions Raise or Lower Your Blood Pressure? The Answer Depends on Cultural Context.
Butler EA, Lee TL, Gross JJ. Butler EA, et al. J Cross Cult Psychol. 2009 May;40(3):510-517. doi: 10.1177/0022022109332845. J Cross Cult Psychol. 2009. PMID: 25505801 Free PMC article.
Emotion-expressive behavior is often - but not always -- inversely related to physiological responding. To test the hypothesis that cultural context moderates the relationship between expressivity and physiological responding, we had Asian American and European American wo …
Emotion-expressive behavior is often - but not always -- inversely related to physiological responding. To test the hypothesis that cultu
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