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Page 1
. 2024 Jun 21;14(6):e087240.
doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2024-087240.

Addressing the unmet needs of women with breast cancer in Mexico: a non-randomised pilot study of the digital ePRO intervention

Affiliations
Free article

Addressing the unmet needs of women with breast cancer in Mexico: a non-randomised pilot study of the digital ePRO intervention

Saúl Eduardo Contreras Sánchez et al. BMJ Open. .
Free article

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to explore the acceptability, feasibility, usability, and preliminary effect of an electronic patient-reported outcome (ePRO) intervention for patients with breast cancer in Mexico.

Design: We conducted a multimethod non-randomised pilot study. We used a pre-test/post-test design for quantitative assessment of the intervention's effect on patients' supportive care needs and quality of life. We conducted in-depth interviews (IDIs) with participants and healthcare workers to explore the intervention's benefits and barriers and understand its feasibility.

Participants: 50 women aged 20-75 diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer were enrolled within 2 weeks of starting neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. We excluded illiterate women and those with visual impairment, cognitive disability or severe depression. IDIs were conducted with 18 participants and 10 healthcare providers.

Setting: Oncology services in three public hospitals of the Mexican Social Security Institute.

Intervention: The ePRO intervention consisted of a responsive web application for weekly symptom reporting combined with proactive follow-up by nurses guided by predefined clinical algorithms for 6 weeks.

Results: 50 women were enrolled out of 66 eligible patients approached (75.8%). All 50 completed the 4-week follow-up assessment (100% retention). Completion of the symptom registry declined from 100% in week 1 to 66% in week 6. Participants experienced decreases in supportive care needs and increased quality of life. The ePRO application was rated highly usable. Participants and health professionals both perceived intervention benefits. Drawbacks included poor fit for women receiving radiotherapy and challenges using the application for women with low digital literacy or experiencing severe symptoms.

Conclusions: This pilot study provided evidence of the high usability and potential efficacy of a web-based ePRO intervention. We revised recruitment during the pilot to include multiple facilities, and we will further revise for the randomised trial to address barriers to successful ePRO implementation.

Trial registration number: ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT05925257.

Keywords: breast tumours; ehealth; nurses.

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interests: None declared.

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Multicenter Study
. 2024 Jun 21;24(1):176.
doi: 10.1186/s12911-024-02569-1.

Using a smartphone-based self-management platform to study sex differences in Parkinson's disease: multicenter, cross-sectional pilot study

Affiliations
Multicenter Study

Using a smartphone-based self-management platform to study sex differences in Parkinson's disease: multicenter, cross-sectional pilot study

Zhiheng Xu et al. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. .

Abstract

Background: Patient-reported outcome (PRO) is a distinct and indispensable dimension of clinical characteristics and recent advances have made remote PRO measurement possible. Sex difference in PRO of Parkinson's disease (PD) is hardly extensively researched.

Methods: A smartphone-based self-management platform, offering remote PRO measurement for PD patients, has been developed. A total of 1828 PD patients, including 1001 male patients and 827 female patients, were enrolled and completed their PRO submission through this platform.

Results: Sex differences in PROs have been identified. The female group had a significantly lower height, weight, and body mass index (BMI) than the male group (P < 0.001). For motor symptoms, a higher proportion of patients reporting dyskinesia was observed in the female group. For non-motor symptoms, there is a higher percentage (P < 0.001) as well as severity (P = 0.016) of depression in the female group. More male patients reported hyposmia, lisp, drooling, dysuria, frequent urination, hypersexuality, impotence, daytime sleepiness, and apathy than females (P < 0.05). In contrast, more female patients reported headache, palpation, body pain, anorexia, nausea, urinal incontinence, anxiety, insomnia (P < 0.05) than males.

Conclusions: We provide evidence for sex differences in PD through the data collected from our platform. These results highlighted the importance of gender in clinical decision-making, and also support the feasibility of remote PRO measurement through a smartphone-based self-management platform in patients with PD.

Keywords: Parkinson’s disease; Patient-reported outcomes; Sex differences; mHealth.

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. 2024 Jun;13(12):e7339.
doi: 10.1002/cam4.7339.

The feasibility and acceptability of collecting psychosocial outcome measures embedded within a precision medicine trial for childhood cancer

Affiliations

The feasibility and acceptability of collecting psychosocial outcome measures embedded within a precision medicine trial for childhood cancer

Eden G Robertson et al. Cancer Med. 2024 Jun.

Abstract

Background: Patient-reported outcomes measures (PROMs) are increasingly being collected within cancer clinical trials, yet limited literature on the feasibility and acceptability of doing so.

Methods: We collected parent-proxy and adolescent (≥12 years old) PROMs through a longitudinal, psychosocial sub-study ('PRISM-Impact') embedded in a precision medicine trial for children with poor prognosis cancer ('PRISM'). We report on feasibility (response, participation, and attrition rates; follow-up and responding to elevated distress) and acceptability (parents' perceived benefit/burden of participation; and impact on decision to participate in PRISM) of PRISM-Impact.

Results: Over the reporting period, 462 families were eligible for PRISM-Impact. Family and adolescent response rates were 53% and 45%, respectively. Parents whose child had relapsed were more likely to participate in PRISM-Impact than parents whose child had not (p < 0.001). Parent and adolescent attrition rates were 30% and 56% respectively. We conducted 478 calls for intake and to follow-up on missing questionnaires, and 122 calls to respond to elevated distress. Parents reported wanting to participate in PRISM-Impact for altruistic reasons and because they valued psychosocial research. Parents reported little-to-no burden and some benefit from participating in PRISM-Impact, with little change in ratings overtime. Most parents felt that participating in PRISM-Impact did not impact their desire to participate in PRISM (72%), with some feeling more eager to participate (19%).

Conclusions: PRISM-Impact response rates were comparable to other psycho-oncology studies, despite the poor prognosis population. Integration of PROMs within a paediatric oncology trial is acceptable to parents, and may provide a more comprehensive assessment of the impact of trial participation.

Keywords: acceptability; clinical trial; feasibility; oncology; outcome measures; paediatric; psychosocial.

Conflict of interest statement

DSZ reports consulting / advisory board fees from Bayer, Astra Zeneca, Accendatech, Novartis, Day One, FivePhusion, Amgen, Alexion, and Norgine and research support from Accendatech.

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Multicenter Study
. 2024 Jun 19:104:adv38889.
doi: 10.2340/actadv.v104.38889.

Cross-Cultural Validation of the RECAP of Atopic Eczema Question-naire in a Swedish Population

Affiliations
Multicenter Study

Cross-Cultural Validation of the RECAP of Atopic Eczema Question-naire in a Swedish Population

Gunnthorunn Sigurdardottir et al. Acta Derm Venereol. .

Abstract

A Swedish translation of the patient-reported outcome measure for assessing long-term control of atopic dermatitis, Recap of atopic eczema (RECAP), has not been validated. Cross-cultural translation and multi-centre validation of the translated RECAP questionnaire were therefore performed. Disease severity was assessed using the validated Investigator Global Assessment Scale for atopic dermatitis (vIGA-ADTM). The Swedish RECAP was completed by 208 individuals aged 16 years or older with a median age of 36 years (interquartile range [IQR] 27-48). The participants considered the questionnaire suitable for assessing eczema control. The median RECAP score (range 0-28) was 12 (IQR 5-19). The mean and median vIGA-ADTM scores (range 0-4) were 2 (standard deviation [SD] 2) and 3 (IQR 2-4), respectively. A correlation between RECAP and the vIGA-ADTM was observed (p < 0.001). There was no significant change in scores for participants who answered the questionnaire twice within 14 days. Over time, improved or worsened eczema, as evaluat-ed by vIGA-ADTM, affected RECAP scores significantly (p < 0.001). The study suggests that RECAP can assess AD control in a Swedish clinical setting and shows -acceptable reliability.

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. 2024 Jun 18;21(1):40.
doi: 10.1186/s12981-024-00632-5.

Patient-reported outcomes and experiences of migrants enrolled in a multidisciplinary HIV clinic with rapid, free, and onsite treatment dispensation: the 'ASAP' study

Affiliations

Patient-reported outcomes and experiences of migrants enrolled in a multidisciplinary HIV clinic with rapid, free, and onsite treatment dispensation: the 'ASAP' study

Anish K Arora et al. AIDS Res Ther. .

Abstract

Background: Scholars recommend providing migrants living with HIV (MLWH) with free treatment, rapidly, once linked to care to optimize their HIV-related experiences and health outcomes. Quantitative evaluations of patient-reported measures for MLWH in such models are necessary to explore the viability of these recommendations.

Methods: Within a 96-week prospective cohort study at a multidisciplinary HIV clinic, participants received bictegravir/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide (B/F/TAF) for free and rapidly following care linkage. Eight patient-reported measures were administered at weeks 4, 24, and 48: (1) mMOS-SS to measure perceived social support; (2) IA-RSS to measure internalized stigma; (3) K6 to measure psychological distress; (4) PROMIS to measure self-efficacy with treatment taking; (5) G-MISS to measure perceived compliance with clinicians' treatment plans; (6) HIVTSQ to measure treatment satisfaction; (7) CARE to measure perceived provider empathy; and (8) PRPCC to measure perceived clinician cultural competence. Linear mixed modelling with bootstrapping was conducted to identify significant differences by sociodemographics and time.

Results: Across weeks 4, 24, and 48, results suggest that MLWH enrolled in this study experienced moderate levels of social support; elevated levels of HIV-related stigma; moderate levels of distress; high self-efficacy with daily medication self-management; great compliance with clinicians' treatment plans; high treatment satisfaction; high perceived empathy; and high perceived cultural competence. Experience of social support (i.e., mMOS-SS scores) differed significantly by birth region. Experience of HIV-related stigma (i.e., IA-RSS scores) differed significantly by birth region, age, and language. Experience of distress (i.e., K6 scores) differed significantly by sexual orientation. Experience of treatment satisfaction (i.e., HIVTSQ scores) differed significantly by birth region and age. No significant differences were identified by time for any measure.

Conclusion: Overall, participants expressed positive experiences around treatment and care, alongside comparably lower perceptions of social support, internalized stigma, and distress, potentially underscoring a need to embed targeted, well-funded, and accessible mental health support within HIV care models.

Keywords: Care experience; HIV; Migrants; Multidisciplinary; Patient-reported outcomes.

Conflict of interest statement

Dr. Bertrand Lebouché has received consultancy fees and/or honoraria and research funds from Gilead, ViiV Healthcare, and Merck. The organizations and the above funders had no role in the design of the study; in the collection, analyses, or interpretation of data; or in the decision to publish the results.

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. 2024 Jun 18;8(6):e23.00222.
doi: 10.5435/JAAOSGlobal-D-23-00222. eCollection 2024 Jun 1.

Patient-Reported Outcomes After Intramedullary Nailing of Oncologic Impending or Pathologic Fractures With Carbon Fiber or Titanium Implant

Affiliations

Patient-Reported Outcomes After Intramedullary Nailing of Oncologic Impending or Pathologic Fractures With Carbon Fiber or Titanium Implant

Marcos R Gonzalez et al. J Am Acad Orthop Surg Glob Res Rev. .

Abstract

Introduction: Despite the benefits of intramedullary nailing (IMN) of impending or pathologic fractures in oncologic patients, literature on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) is scarce in patients treated with carbon fiber (CF) nails. Our study compared postoperative PROs after IMN with CF or titanium implants.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective propensity score-matched cohort study of patients treated at our institution with CF or titanium nails for impending or pathologic fractures from metastatic bone disease. Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Global Health Short Form (SF) Physical, Mental, and Physical Function 10a scores were collected. Pain was assessed using visual analog scale (VAS). Absolute and differential scores were compared between groups.

Results: We included 207 patients, 51 treated with CF and 156 with titanium nails. One month postoperatively, patients had a one-point decrease in the pain VAS score while PROMIS scores did not improve. At 3 months, PROMIS SF Physical and SF 10a scores improved from preoperative values. Six months postoperatively, median PROMIS SF Physical, SF Mental, and SF 10a scores were higher than preoperative scores. Absolute and differential PROMIS and pain VAS scores were similar between groups at the 6-month and 1-year marks.

Conclusion: Patient-reported outcomes were similar after intramedullary nailing with either CF or titanium implants.

Conflict of interest statement

Dr. Lozano-Calderon or an immediate family member is a member of a speakers’ bureau or has made paid presentations on behalf of CarboFix Orthopedics (Ocean Isle Beach, NC 28469). None of the following authors or any immediate family member has received anything of value from or has stock or stock options held in a commercial company or institution related directly or indirectly to the subject of this article: Ms. Xu, Ms. Sodhi, Mr. Fang, Ms. Kim, Mr. Groot, Dr. Schwab, Dr. Gonzalez.

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. 2024 Jul 1;93(1):22-29.
doi: 10.1097/SAP.0000000000003974.

Patient-Reported Outcomes and Complication Profiles of Implant-Based Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy

Affiliations

Patient-Reported Outcomes and Complication Profiles of Implant-Based Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy

Jian Liu et al. Ann Plast Surg. .

Abstract

Objective: This study aims to investigate the patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and complications of distinct implant-based breast reconstruction modality for patients with postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT).

Methods: A retrospective review was conducted on breast cancer patients with stage II-III disease who performed implant-based breast reconstruction following with PMRT between September 2016 and April 2022. The patients were categorized into two matched groups: (1) patients receiving prepectoral breast reconstruction (PBR) or (2) subpectoral breast reconstruction (SBR) followed by PMRT. Following reconstruction, the patients were further compared for PMRT with the tissue expander (PMRT-TE) versus PMRT with permanent implant (PMRT-PI). PROs were measured with BREAST-Q questionnaire. Early and late complications were recorded and analyzed.

Results: A total of 55 eligible patients were recruited. Patients who underwent PBR reported significantly higher satisfaction with breasts scores (P = 0.003) compared with the SBR group. The PMRT-TE group had higher satisfaction with breasts (P = 0.001) but lower physical well-being (P = 0.029) scores compared with PMRT-PI group. Moreover, patients in SBR cohort had a higher risk of capsular contracture (Baker grade III or IV) (20.5% vs 6.3%) and implant dislocation (48.7% vs 12.5%) than patients in PBR cohort. Patients in PMRT-PI group had a slightly higher rate of capsular contracture (Baker grade III or IV) than PMRT-TE group (20.8% vs 12.9%).

Conclusions: PBR was associated with lower rates of late complications, especially for implant dislocation, and higher satisfaction with breasts scores compared to SBR. In addition, compared to PMRT-TE with PMRT-PI, patients in PMRT-TE cohort reported superior PROs of satisfaction with breasts.

Conflict of interest statement

Conflicts of interest and sources of funding: none declared.

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. 2024 Jun 17;8(1):61.
doi: 10.1186/s41687-024-00731-x.

Psychometric evaluation of the patient-reported experience of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia (PRECIS) scale

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Psychometric evaluation of the patient-reported experience of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia (PRECIS) scale

William R Lenderking et al. J Patient Rep Outcomes. .

Abstract

Background: Cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia (CIAS) represents a distinct, persistent, and core group of schizophrenia symptoms. Cognitive symptoms have been shown to have an impact on quality of life. There are several published CIAS measures, but none based on direct patient self-report. It is important to capture the patient's perspective to supplement performancebased outcome measures of cognition to provide a complete picture of the patient's experience. This paper describes additional validation work on the Patient-Reported Experience of Cognitive Impairment in Schizophrenia (PRECIS) instrument.

Methods: Data from two large, international, pharmaceutical clinical trials in medically and psychiatrically stable English-speaking patients with schizophrenia and 88 healthy controls were analyzed. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted in one trial (n = 215), using the original 35-item PRECIS. The factor structure suggested by EFA was further evaluated using item response theory (IRT; Samejima's graded response model), and tested using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Both EFA and CFA results were tested in a second trial with similar inclusion/exclusion characteristics (n = 410). Additional statistical properties were evaluated in healthy controls.

Results: EFA suggested that the best solution after item reduction suggested a factor structure of 6 factors based on 26 items (memory, communication, self-control, executive function, attention, sharpness of thought), supporting a total score, with an additional 2-item bother score (28 items in all). IRT analysis indicated the items were well-ordered within each domain. The CFA demonstrated excellent model fit, accounting for 69% of the variance. The statistical properties of the 28-item version of the PRECIS were confirmed in the second trial. Evidence for internal consistency and test-retest reliability was robust. Known-groups validity was supported by comparison of healthy controls with patients with schizophrenia. Correlations indicated moderate associations between PRECIS and functioning instruments like the Schizophrenia Cognition Rating Scale (SCoRS), but weak correlations with performance-based outcomes like MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB).

Discussion: Using two clinical trial samples, we identified a robust factor structure for the PRECIS and were able to replicate it in the second sample. Evaluation of the meaningful score difference (MSD) should be repeated in future studies, as these samples did not show enough change for it to be evaluated.

Conclusions: This analysis provides strong evidence for the reliability and validity of the PRECIS, a 28-item, patient-reported instrument to assess cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia. The correlation with functioning and the weak correlation with performance on cognitive tasks suggests that patient reports of cognitive impairment measure a unique aspect of patient experience.

Keywords: Cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia (CIAS); Cognitive symptoms; Factor analysis; Patient-reported experience of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia (PRECIS); Psychometric validation.

Conflict of interest statement

WRL, MJA, MKL, and YS were paid employees of Evidera at the time this research was conducted and as such conducted research on behalf of many pharmaceutical companies in the course of their employment. SS, and CH are the employees of Boehringer Ingelheim. MS was the employee of Boehringer Ingelheim at the time this work was completed.

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. 2024 Jan 12:12:299.
doi: 10.12688/f1000research.131702.2. eCollection 2023.

Load-induced blood marker kinetics in patients with medial knee compartment osteoarthritis are associated with accumulated load and patient reported outcome measures

Affiliations

Load-induced blood marker kinetics in patients with medial knee compartment osteoarthritis are associated with accumulated load and patient reported outcome measures

Annegret Mündermann et al. F1000Res. .

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to quantify the mechanoresponse of 10 blood marker candidates for joint metabolism to a walking stress test in patients with knee osteoarthritis and to determine the association among marker kinetics and with accumulated load and patient reported outcomes.

Methods: 24 patients with knee osteoarthritis completed questionnaires, and a 30-minute walking stress test with six blood serum samples and gait analysis. Concentrations of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-1, -3, and -9, epitope resulting from cleavage of type II collagen by collagenases (C2C), type II procollagen (CPII), interleukin (IL)-6, proteoglycan (PRG)-4, A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS)-4, and resistin were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Joint load (moments and compartmental forces) was estimated using musculoskeletal modeling using gait analysis data.

Results: COMP and MMP-3 showed an immediate increase after the walking stress followed by a decrease. MMP-9 and resistin showed a delayed decrease below pre-stress levels. ∆COMP correlated with ∆MMP-3 for most time points. ∆MMP-9 correlated with ∆resistin for most time points. The load-induced increase in blood marker levels correlated among blood markers and time points. C2C and resistin correlated positively and C2C/CPII and MMP2 correlated negatively with load during gait. Immediate relative ∆CPII and ∆MMP1 and delayed relative ∆COMP, ∆IL6, ∆C2C, ∆CPII, ∆MMP1 and ∆MMP3 correlated with the load accumulated during the walking stress. Baseline C2C levels correlated with Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales and load-induced changes in MMP-3 with KOOS and Short Form 36 quality of life subscores (P<0.05).

Conclusions: The distinct and differentiated physiological response to the walking stress depends on accumulated load and appears relevant for patient reported osteoarthritis outcome and quality of life and warrants further investigation in the context of disease progression.ClinicalTrials.gov registration: NCT02622204.

Keywords: Knee osteoarthritis; PROMs; ambulatory load; articular cartilage; in vivo mechanoresponse; serum biomarkers; stress test.

Conflict of interest statement

No competing interests were disclosed.

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. 2024 Jul:39:201-208.
doi: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2024.03.004. Epub 2024 Mar 7.

Evaluating the additive diagnostic value of DidRen LaserTest: Correlating temporal and kinematic predictors and patient-reported outcome measures in acute-subacute non-specific neck pain

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Evaluating the additive diagnostic value of DidRen LaserTest: Correlating temporal and kinematic predictors and patient-reported outcome measures in acute-subacute non-specific neck pain

Guillaume Hage et al. J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2024 Jul.
No abstract available

Conflict of interest statement

Declaration of competing interest None.

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. 2024 Jun 14:95:284-289.
doi: 10.2340/17453674.2024.40817.

Patient-reported outcomes after minimally invasive sacro-iliac joint surgery: a cohort study based on the Swedish Spine Registry

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Patient-reported outcomes after minimally invasive sacro-iliac joint surgery: a cohort study based on the Swedish Spine Registry

Engelke Marie Randers et al. Acta Orthop. .

Abstract

Background and purpose: There is conflicting evidence regarding treatment outcomes after minimally invasive sacroiliac joint fusion for long-lasting severe sacroiliac joint pain. The primary aim of our cohort study was to investigate change in patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) after minimally invasive sacroiliac joint surgery in daily practice in the Swedish Spine Registry. Secondary aims were to explore the proportion of patients reaching a patient acceptable symptom score (PASS) and the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) for pain scores, physical function, and health-related quality of life outcomes; furthermore, to evaluate self-reported satisfaction, walking distance, and changes in proportions of patients on full sick leave/disability leave and report complications and reoperations.

Methods: Data from the Swedish Spine Registry was collected for patients with first-time sacroiliac joint fusion, aged 21 to 70 years, with PROMs available preoperatively, at 1 or 2 years after last surgery. PROMs included Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for low back pain (LBP) and leg pain, and EQ-VAS, in addition to demographic variables. We calculated mean change from pre- to postoperative and the proportion of patients achieving MCID and PASS.

Results: 68 patients had available pre- and postoperative data, with a mean age of 45 years (range 25-70) and 59 (87%) were female. At follow-up the mean reduction was 2.3 NRS points (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-2.9; P < 0.001) for LBP and 14.8 points (CI 10.6-18.9; P < 0.001) for ODI. EQ-VAS improved by 22 points (CI 15.4-30.3, P < 0.001) at follow-up. Approximately half of the patients achieved MCID and PASS for pain (MCID NRS LBP: 38/65 [59%] and PASS NRS LBP: 32/66 [49%]) and physical function (MCID ODI: 27/67 [40%] and PASS ODI: 24/67 [36%]). The odds for increasing the patient's walking distance to over 1 km at follow-up were 3.5 (CI 1.8-7.0; P < 0.0001), and of getting off full sick leave or full disability leave was 0.57 (CI 0.4-0.8; P = 0.001). In the first 3 months after surgery 3 complications were reported, and in the follow-up period 2 reoperations.

Conclusion: We found moderate treatment outcomes after minimally invasive sacroiliac joint fusion when applied in daily practice with moderate pain relief and small improvements in physical function.

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Comparative Study
. 2024 Jun 12;8(6):e24.00124.
doi: 10.5435/JAAOSGlobal-D-24-00124. eCollection 2024 Jun 1.

Patient-Reported Outcomes of Total Hip Arthroplasty at an Ambulatory Surgery Center Versus a Hospital-Based Center

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Comparative Study

Patient-Reported Outcomes of Total Hip Arthroplasty at an Ambulatory Surgery Center Versus a Hospital-Based Center

Annabelle P Davey et al. J Am Acad Orthop Surg Glob Res Rev. .

Abstract

Introduction: The utilization of ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) and same-day discharge (SDD) from hospital-based centers (HBCs) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) continues to increase. There remains a paucity of literature directly comparing patient-reported outcomes by surgery site. We sought to compare outcomes between patients undergoing THA at an ASC versus HBC while controlling for medical comorbidities.

Methods: Patients undergoing primary THA with SDD (postoperative day 0) from a single HBC (1,015 patients) or stand-alone ASC (170 patients) from December 2020 to 2021 were identified. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and 90-day complications were collected. Hip Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS JR), VR-12, and procedural satisfaction scores were collected preoperatively and at 3, 6, and 12 months. Patients were matched by age and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). Chi-squared analysis was conducted to compare categorical variables, and a Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used for continuous variables. Linear regression models were conducted considering age, sex, and presence of comorbidities.

Results: Patients undergoing THA at an ASC had markedly higher VR-12 Physical Component Scores at all time points and improved VR-12 Mental Component Scores at preoperative visit and 6 months. These patients had increased procedural satisfaction at 3 months, although there was no difference at 1 year. No notable difference was observed in 90-day complication rates between groups. After matching by age and ASA, each group had 170 patients. In the matched analysis, preoperative HOOS JR scores were markedly lower in the HBC group. However, there was no notable difference in HOOS JR scores, change in HOOS JR scores, and procedural satisfaction, at any postoperative time point.

Conclusions: No notable difference was observed in patient-reported outcomes at any time point for SDD after THA performed at an ASC or an HBC when controlling for age and comorbidities. This study suggests noninferiority of stand-alone ASCs for outpatient THA, regarding patient satisfaction and patient-reported outcomes.

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Editorial
. 2024 Jun 12;8(1):59.
doi: 10.1186/s41687-024-00715-x.

Update to state of the Journal of Patient-Reported Outcomes

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Editorial

Update to state of the Journal of Patient-Reported Outcomes

Rasa Ruseckaite et al. J Patient Rep Outcomes. .