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Table representation of search results timeline featuring number of search results per year.

Year Number of Results
1967 2
1968 3
1969 3
1970 5
1971 1
1972 5
1973 4
1974 1
1975 7
1976 3
1977 4
1978 3
1979 4
1980 8
1981 3
1982 4
1983 5
1984 8
1985 13
1986 28
1987 48
1988 76
1989 82
1990 94
1991 104
1992 65
1993 95
1994 92
1995 128
1996 127
1997 174
1998 200
1999 176
2000 180
2001 159
2002 164
2003 176
2004 163
2005 192
2006 188
2007 186
2008 177
2009 150
2010 148
2011 167
2012 146
2013 156
2014 147
2015 146
2016 130
2017 130
2018 102
2019 77
2020 1
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4,441 results
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Page 1
Adhesion and Invasion of Gastric Mucosa Epithelial Cells by Helicobacter pylori.
Huang Y, et al. Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2016 - Review. PMID 27921009 Free PMC article.
Therefore, to explore the process and mechanism of adhesion and invasion of gastric mucosa epithelial cells by H. pylori is particularly important. This review examines the relevant studies and describes evidence regarding the adhesion to and invasion of gastric mucosa epithelial cells by H. pylori....
Therefore, to explore the process and mechanism of adhesion and invasion of gastric mucosa epithelial cells by H. pylori is pa …
Helicobacter pylori Infection, the Gastric Microbiome and Gastric Cancer.
Pereira-Marques J, et al. Adv Exp Med Biol 2019 - Review. PMID 31016631
In addition to H. pylori infection and to multiple host and environmental factors that influence disease development, alterations to the composition and function of the normal gastric microbiome, also known as dysbiosis, may also contribute to malignancy. Chronic inflammation of the mucosa in response to H. pylori may alter the gastric environment, paving the way to the growth of a dysbiotic gastric bacterial community. ...
In addition to H. pylori infection and to multiple host and environmental factors that influence disease development, alterations to …
Gastric Microbiota.
Ianiro G, et al. Helicobacter 2015 - Review. PMID 26372828
In 2015, evolving data shows that H. pylori is not the only inhabitant of the gastric mucosa. Using culture-independent methods of analysis, a non-H. pylori microbial community has been recently observed in the human stomach, the so-called human gastric microbiota, along with H. pylori itself. ...Further studies are warranted to offer a better picture of the role and functions of gastric microbiota and to identify the best therapeutic modulators of gut microbiota for the management of gastric diseases....
In 2015, evolving data shows that H. pylori is not the only inhabitant of the gastric mucosa. Using culture-independent method …
A comparison of Helicobacter pylori and non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter spp. Binding to canine gastric mucosa with defined gastric glycophenotype.
Amorim I, et al. Helicobacter 2014. PMID 24689986
The colonization of the human gastric mucosa by H. pylori is highly dependent on the recognition of host glycan receptors. Our goal was to define the canine gastric mucosa glycophenotype and to evaluate the capacity of different gastric Helicobacter species to adhere to the canine gastric mucosa. ...CONCLUSIONS: The canine gastric mucosa showed a glycosylation profile different from the human gastric mucosa suggesting that alternative glycan receptors may be involved in Helicobacter spp. binding. ...
The colonization of the human gastric mucosa by H. pylori is highly dependent on the recognition of host glycan receptors. Our …
Detection of Helicobacter pylori in the Gastric Mucosa by Fluorescence In Vivo Hybridization.
Fontenete S, et al. Methods Mol Biol 2017. PMID 28600766
In this chapter, we describe a fluorescence in vivo hybridization (FIVH) protocol, using nucleic acid probes, for the detection of the bacterium Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa of an infected C57BL/6 mouse model. ...
In this chapter, we describe a fluorescence in vivo hybridization (FIVH) protocol, using nucleic acid probes, for the detection of the bacte …
[Molecular Mechanisms for Adhesion and Colonization of Human Gastric Mucosa by Helicobacter pylori and its Clinical Implications].
Coelho E, et al. Acta Med Port 2016 - Review. PMID 27914159 Portuguese. Free article.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this review, we present an overview of the current knowledge on the determinants of the infection and on the recently described molecular mechanisms of Helicobacter pylori adhesion to the gastric mucosa, as well as its possible future therapeutic application. RESULTS: The adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to the gastric epithelium is critical for gastric pathogenesis, allowing bacterial access to nutrients and the action of bacterial virulence factors, promoting recurrence of the infection and the progression of the gastric carcinogenesis pathway. ...
MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this review, we present an overview of the current knowledge on the determinants of the infection and on the recent …
Helicobacter pylori SabA binding gangliosides of human stomach
Benktander J, et al. Virulence 2018. PMID 29473478 Free PMC article.
Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to the gastric mucosa is a prerequisite for the pathogenesis of H. pylori related diseases. In this study, we investigated the ganglioside composition of human stomach as the target for attachment mediated by H. pylori SabA (sialic acid binding adhesin). ...Defining H. pylori binding glycosphingolipids of the human gastric mucosa will be useful to specifically target this microbe-host interaction for therapeutic intervention....
Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to the gastric mucosa is a prerequisite for the pathogenesis of H. pylori related diseases. In …
Apoptosis in the gastric mucosa: molecular mechanisms, basic and clinical implications.
Szabó I and Tarnawski AS. J Physiol Pharmacol 2000 - Review. PMID 10768847 Free article.
Following mucosal injury (e.g. ulcer development), apoptosis rapidly increases and remains elevated for 2-3 months. In a 3-month old ulcer scar, the apoptosis rate of mucous, parietal, chief and endocrine cells was found to be similar to that of normal gastric mucosa. ...Many details of the exact intracellular and molecular mechanisms regulating apoptosis in gastric mucosa remain to be elucidated....
Following mucosal injury (e.g. ulcer development), apoptosis rapidly increases and remains elevated for 2-3 months. In a 3-month old …
Sarcina ventriculi
Oddó D and Díaz Y. Rev Chilena Infectol 2019. PMID 31095203 Spanish. Free article.
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