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Table representation of search results timeline featuring number of search results per year.

Year Number of Results
2016 2
2017 27
2018 212
2019 38
2020 2
2024 0

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212 results

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Filters applied: Meta-Analysis, Systematic Review. Clear all
Page 1
Meta-Analysis
. 2020 Mar;42(6):743-753.
doi: 10.1080/09638288.2018.1508509. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Are interventions effective in improving the ability of older adults to rise from the floor independently? A mixed method systematic review

Affiliations
Meta-Analysis

Are interventions effective in improving the ability of older adults to rise from the floor independently? A mixed method systematic review

Elissa Burton et al. Disabil Rehabil. 2020 Mar.

Abstract

Purpose: To review available evidence on older people's ability to get up off the floor independently and determine the effectiveness of interventions to improve older adults' ability to rise from the floor.Materials and methods: Seven databases were searched between January 1975 and June 2018. Eligibility criteria included: people aged ≥60; interventions to improve strength/function including ability to get up off the floor (for intervention studies); comparison groups (for randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials); outcome: quantitative or qualitative evaluation of ability to get up off the floor. Selection of the studies was undertaken in three stages: (1) titles and abstracts were scanned by one reviewer, (2) full abstract screening by one reviewer, and (3) articles read in full by two reviewers. Results of all articles are summarized and randomized controlled trials (RCT) (where possible) were analyzed by meta-analysis to determine intervention effectiveness.Results: Forty-one studies met inclusion criteria. For each of the RCTs that utilized resistance training and/or teaching the skill, a reduction in time to get up off the floor were reported. However, meta-analyses of all RCT interventions indicated no significant change in time for older people to get up off the floor independently with intervention (MD: -0.43[-1.38, 0.51]). Sub-analyses of interventions utilizing resistance training showed an improvement trending towards significance (MD: -0.81[-1.72, 0.09]). Heterogeneity between studies was high, therefore results should be viewed with some caution.Conclusions: Resistance training interventions may improve older people's ability to rise from the floor unassisted. However, knowledge of specific techniques to get up and the effect of simply practicing the task of getting off the floor need to be further explored.Implication for rehabilitationOne in three older people living in the community fall each yearOne aspect of falling that is often overlooked is whether the older person can get themselves up off the floor independently or do they have to wait for assistance.Interventions that include resistance training may help the older person to be able to get up by themselves.

Keywords: Aging; falls; getting up off the ground; meta-analysis; older people.

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Meta-Analysis
. 2020 Feb;15(2):132-140.
doi: 10.1080/17483107.2018.1533595. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

Effects of environmental modification on activities of daily living, social participation and quality of life in the older adults: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Affiliations
Meta-Analysis

Effects of environmental modification on activities of daily living, social participation and quality of life in the older adults: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Young Myoung Lim et al. Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2020 Feb.

Abstract

Purpose: This study aims to provide evidence of the benefits and effects of environmental modification intervention on activities of daily living, quality of life and social participation in older adults.Methods: This study searched and used randomized controlled trial research studies from the databases of MEDLINE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted using the Jadad scale, risk of bias and the patient, intervention, comparison, outcome (PICO) process. The domains of impact considered in this meta-analysis were activities of daily living, quality of life and social participation. The analysis was completed with the Review Manager software 5.3.Results: Jadad scores of collected studies were 3-4 in seven studies and 2 in one study, which means that most studies had high levels of quality. This study comprised of 733 subjects in the experimental group and 672 subjects in the control group. The effect size of environmental interventions on basic activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living and overall activities of daily living were 0.37, 0.65 and 0.47, respectively. Meanwhile, the environmental intervention was neither effective on quality of life nor social participation.Conclusions: Environmental modifications are effective in facilitating the daily life activities of older adults. This kind of intervention is shown to be useful for enhancing life performance. In order to confirm intervention effects on the quality of life and social participation of older adults, studies should conduct environmental modifications interventions that take into account contexts such as individual characteristics, lifestyle and physical activities.Implications for rehabilitationEnvironmental modifications are effective in improving older adults' performance of daily activities (ADL).Appropriate environmental modification interventions should be considered before the quality of life (QoL) and levels of social participation of older adults decline.

Keywords: Meta-analysis; activities of daily living; environmental modification; older adults; quality of life; social participation.

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. 2019 Jul;31(7):917-925.
doi: 10.1007/s40520-018-1034-6. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Activities of daily living in older community-dwelling persons: a systematic review of psychometric properties of instruments

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Activities of daily living in older community-dwelling persons: a systematic review of psychometric properties of instruments

Marijke Hopman-Rock et al. Aging Clin Exp Res. 2019 Jul.

Abstract

Background: Activities of daily living (ADL) are often used as predictors of health and function in older persons. This systematic review is part of a series initiated by the European Network for Action on Ageing and Physical Activity (EUNAAPA).

Aim: To assess psychometric properties of ADL instruments for use in older populations.

Methods: Electronic databases (Medline, EMBASE, AMED, Psycinfo, CINAHL) were searched, using MeSH terms and relevant keywords. Studies, published in English, were included if they evaluated one or more psychometric properties of ADL instruments in community-dwelling older persons aged 60 years and older. Combination scales with IADL were excluded. This systematic review adhered to a pre-specified protocol regarding reliability, validity, and responsiveness.

Results: In total, 140 articles describing more than 50 different ADL instruments were included. Ten instruments which were applied in minimally three different articles of good quality (clear descriptions and adequate design according to the protocol), were evaluated for reliability, validity and responsiveness; each received a summary score. The four instruments with the highest scores were the Functional Autonomy Measurement System (SMAF), 5-items Katz list (although content and wording are often inconsistent across studies), Functional Independence and Difficulty Scale (FIDS) and the Barthel Index.

Discussion: Critical reflection is essential to avoid unnecessary modifications and use of instruments that have not been documented to be valid or reliable.

Conclusion: Based on this systematic review, we recommend the SMAF, 5-item Katz, FIDS and Barthel index as ADL measures for research and care practice in older populations.

Keywords: Activities of daily living; Aging; Assessment; Community dwelling; Function; Health status.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest regarding the publication of this paper. The authors have also no links with the recommended ADL lists.

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. 2019 Jul;26(5):343-355.
doi: 10.1080/11038128.2018.1441323. Epub 2018 Feb 28.

Meaningful engagement and person-centered residential dementia care: A critical interpretive synthesis

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Meaningful engagement and person-centered residential dementia care: A critical interpretive synthesis

Sanetta H J Du Toit et al. Scand J Occup Ther. 2019 Jul.

Abstract

Background: People with moderate to advanced dementia living in residential care are at risk of occupational deprivation. Person-centered care has been adopted as a guiding principle in the provision of residential care for older adults with dementia. In this context, there has been shift in occupational therapy practice from addressing occupational performance towards focusing on meaningful engagement. While both meaningful engagement and person-centered care have been well researched the relationship between the two concepts is poorly understood.

Aim: A critical interpretative synthesis was conducted to determine how principles of person-centered care inform occupational therapy practice in relation to promotion of meaningful engagement among residents with moderate to advanced dementia.

Methods: A systematic search of research addressing meaningful engagement of people with moderate to advanced dementia identified 26 papers.

Results: Papers were classified as theoretical papers and empirical research. Two overarching constructs emerged, namely promoting a culture of collaborative care and understanding the resident as a person with a past, present and future.

Conclusions: Occupational deprivation prevails and person-centered care is not fully addressed if opportunities for growth and engagement for residents with moderate to advanced dementia is not extended beyond their life history.

Significance: Creating continued opportunities for building agency of residents with dementia could promote occupational justice in residential care.

Keywords: Dementia; co-occupation; institutional setting; occupational justice; occupational therapists; occupational therapy.

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Meta-Analysis
. 2019 Jun;105(2):187-199.
doi: 10.1016/j.physio.2018.09.002. Epub 2018 Sep 20.

Long-term follow-up of exercise interventions aimed at preventing falls in older people living in the community: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Affiliations
Free article
Meta-Analysis

Long-term follow-up of exercise interventions aimed at preventing falls in older people living in the community: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Susanne Finnegan et al. Physiotherapy. 2019 Jun.
Free article

Abstract

Background: Fall-related injuries are the leading cause of accident-related mortality for older adults, with 30% of those aged 65 years and over falling annually. Exercise is effective in reducing rate and risk of falls in community-dwelling adults; however, there is lack of evidence for the long-term effects of exercise.

Objectives: To assess the long-term effect of exercise interventions on preventing falls in community-dwelling older adults.

Data sources: Searches were undertaken on MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, psycINFO, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and The Cochrane Library from inception to April 2017.

Study selection: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cohort studies or secondary analyses of RCTs with long-term follow-up (>12months) of exercise interventions involving community-dwelling older adults (65 and over) compared to a control group.

Data extraction/ data synthesis: Pairs of review authors independently extracted data. Review Manager (RevMan 5.1) was used for meta-analysis and data were extracted using rate ratio (RaR) and risk ratio (RR).

Results: Twenty-four studies (7818 participants) were included. The overall pooled estimate of the effect of exercise on rate of falling beyond 12-month follow-up was rate ratio (RaR) 0.79 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.71 to 0.88) and risk of falling was risk ratio (RR) 0.83 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.92) Subgroup analyses revealed that there was no sustained effect on rate or risk of falling beyond two years post intervention.

Conclusions: Falls prevention exercise programmes have sustained long-term effects on the number of people falling and the number of falls for up to two years after an exercise intervention.

Systematic review registration number: CRD42017062461.

Keywords: Exercise; Falls prevention; Long-term effects; Older adults.

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Meta-Analysis
. 2019 Jun;105(2):147-162.
doi: 10.1016/j.physio.2018.11.004. Epub 2018 Nov 15.

Effectiveness of interventions for non-specific low back pain in older adults. A systematic review and meta-analysis

Affiliations
Meta-Analysis

Effectiveness of interventions for non-specific low back pain in older adults. A systematic review and meta-analysis

Paulo R C do Nascimento et al. Physiotherapy. 2019 Jun.

Abstract

Objectives: Systematically review the literature about all available interventions to manage non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) in older adults (≥60 years).

Design: We searched the Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, PEDro, and Cochrane CENTRAL databases reference lists for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) testing interventions for NSLBP. Two independent reviewers extracted data, assessed the risk of bias and completeness of the description of interventions.

Results: Eighteen (RCTs) fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Evidence about interventions to manage NSLBP in older adults is weak. Very low to moderate quality evidence showed that complementary health approach (i.e., manual therapy, acupuncture, mindfulness, yoga), percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS), education, exercise or pharmacological agents were not effective to produce a clinically significant reduction in pain and disability at short-term and intermediate-term compared to sham, usual care or minimal intervention. Interventions were moderately well-described according to the template for intervention description and replication (TIDieR) and the risk of bias was moderate 6.4 points on the 10-point PEDro Scale (SD=1.44).

Conclusion: Evidence about interventions for NSLP in older adults is limited and new studies are highly likely to change these results. This result may impact healthcare providers due to the lack of effective evidence based interventions, patients, and policy makers that will expend financial resources with interventions that provide in the best scenario a not significant improvement of the clinical symptoms. Researchers need to consider the importance of designing clinical trials targeting older adults and examine possible outcome modifiers present in this population allowing the recommendation of more efficacious evidence-based interventions.

Systematic review registration number: PROSPERO (CRD42016036686).

Keywords: Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Low back pain; Rehabilitation; Therapeutics.

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. 2019 May;32(3):483-521.
doi: 10.1111/jar.12559. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

How to improve the quality of life of elderly people with intellectual disability: A systematic literature review of support strategies

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How to improve the quality of life of elderly people with intellectual disability: A systematic literature review of support strategies

Hadewych R M M Schepens et al. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2019 May.

Abstract

Background: The increased life expectancy of people with intellectual disability intensifies the need for age-specific support. Research on effects of support strategies on quality of life (QoL) of these people remains scattered.

Methods: A systematic search of peer-reviewed publications since 1995 was performed, with participants having intellectual disability and being aged ≥50 years. Studies include experimental, observational and exploratory designs, analysing links between support strategies and QoL outcomes. The present authors adopted a narrative approach.

Results: The present authors found 73 articles, assessed their quality, thematically categorized interventions into 12 themes, and listed them with their stated relationships to QoL.

Conclusions: The studies indicated the importance of funding, provision and organization of services/personnel, education, and cooperation among different support systems. The provision of good housing or activities, support when these provisions change, provision of (mental) health care, dementia care and end-of-life care, life story work, future planning and support for (I)ADLs are crucial.

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. 2019 May;26(7):776-781.
doi: 10.1177/2047487318811415. Epub 2018 Nov 6.

A systematic overview to quantify the gender imbalance in cardiovascular rehabilitation trials

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A systematic overview to quantify the gender imbalance in cardiovascular rehabilitation trials

Lucia Cugusi et al. Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2019 May.
No abstract available

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. 2019 May;33(3):381.e1-381.e9.
doi: 10.1016/j.jvoice.2017.12.005. Epub 2018 May 3.

The Effects of Phonation Into Glass, Plastic, and LaxVox Tubes in Singers: A Systematic Review

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The Effects of Phonation Into Glass, Plastic, and LaxVox Tubes in Singers: A Systematic Review

Amanda Louize Félix Mendes et al. J Voice. 2019 May.

Abstract

The present study aimed to perform a systematic literature review to assess the effects of phonation therapy on voice quality and function in singers. The systematic search was performed in February and updated in October 2017. No restriction of year, language, or publication status was applied. The primary electronic databases searched were LILACS, SciELO, PubMed, and Cochrane. Kappa coefficient was used to assess the agreement between examiners in judging article eligibility. The eligible articles were analyzed based on their risk of bias using the tools proposed by the Joanna Briggs Institute. Mendeley Desktop 1.13.3 software package (Mendeley Ltd, London, UK) was used to standardize the references of identified articles. The general sample consisted of 1965 articles screened out of the electronic databases. Two examiners analyzed the sample in the search for eligible articles. The agreement between examiners reached excellent outcomes (kappa coefficient = 0.88). After the selection, phase 6 articles remained eligible. Together, the eligible studies accounted 141 subjects (65 men and 76 women) aged between 18 and 72 years old. Electroglottography was considered as the most common method (83.33%) of assessment of the effects of phonation therapy in singers. The most prevalent exercises within the therapies were phonation into straws and phonation into glass tubes. The phonation into glass tubes immersed in water, straws, and LaxVox tubes promoted positive effects on the voice quality in singers, such as more comfortable phonation, better voice projection, and economy in voice emission.

Keywords: Phonation; Semioccluded vocal tract exercises; Singing; Voice; Voice training.

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Meta-Analysis
. 2019 Apr;67(4):749-758.
doi: 10.1111/jgs.15714. Epub 2018 Dec 18.

Effects of Mind-Body Exercises on Cognitive Function in Older Adults: A Meta-Analysis

Affiliations
Meta-Analysis

Effects of Mind-Body Exercises on Cognitive Function in Older Adults: A Meta-Analysis

Chunxiao Wu et al. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2019 Apr.

Abstract

Background/objectives: Mind-body exercise has positive effects on cognitive performance, according to clinical observation and experts' recommendations. However, its potential benefits for the cognitive function of aging adults are uncertain and still lack systematic estimations. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the overall efficacy and effectiveness of mind-body exercises for cognitive performance in aging individuals with or without cognitive impairment.

Design: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Setting and participants: We searched related trials through June 2018 from four databases: Medline, Embase, PsycINFO (all via Ovid), and the Cochrane Library/Central Register of Controlled Trials.

Measurements: Methodological quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. A meta-analysis of comparative effects was performed using Review Manager v.5.3 software, and publication bias was examined using Egger's test.

Results: A total of 32 randomized controlled trials with 3624 participants were ultimately included in this meta-analysis. The results revealed that mind-body exercises as a whole had benefits in improving global cognition compared with that of the control group (mean difference [MD] = 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.33-1.51; p = .002) and were more effective than control interventions in promoting cognitive flexibility (MD = -8.80; 95% CI = -15.22 to -2.38; p = .007), working memory (MD = 0.32; 95% CI = 0.01-0.64; p = .05), verbal fluency (standardized mean difference [SMD] = 0.27; 95% CI = 0.09-0.45; p = .003), and learning (SMD = 0.24; 95% CI = 0.10-0.39; p = .001) on cognitively intact or impaired older adults. In dose-subgroup analysis, only moderate exercise intensity (60-120 min per week) significantly increased global cognition scores compared with those of the control group (MD = 1.15; 95% CI = 0.34-1.97; p = .006).

Conclusion: Mind-body exercises, especially tai chi and dance mind-body exercise, are beneficial for improving global cognition, cognitive flexibility, working memory, verbal fluency, and learning in cognitively intact or impaired older adults. Moderate intensity is recommended as the optimal dose for older adults. J Am Geriatr Soc 67:749-758, 2019.

Keywords: cognitive impairment; cognitive performance; meta-analysis; mind-body exercises; older adults.

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