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Formation of a carcinogenic aromatic amine from an azo dye by human skin bacteria in vitro.
Platzek T, Lang C, Grohmann G, Gi US, Baltes W. Platzek T, et al. Hum Exp Toxicol. 1999 Sep;18(9):552-9. doi: 10.1191/096032799678845061. Hum Exp Toxicol. 1999. PMID: 10523869
For safety evaluation of the dermal exposure of consumers to azo dyes from wearing coloured textiles, a possible cleavage of azo dyes by the skin microflora should be considered since, in contrast to many dyes, aromatic amines are easily absorbe …
For safety evaluation of the dermal exposure of consumers to azo dyes from wearing coloured textiles, a possible cleavage of azo
Patch testing with the textile dyes Disperse Orange 1 and Disperse Yellow 3 and some of their potential metabolites, and simultaneous reactions to para-amino compounds.
Malinauskiene L, Zimerson E, Bruze M, Ryberg K, Isaksson M. Malinauskiene L, et al. Contact Dermatitis. 2012 Sep;67(3):130-40. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0536.2012.02080.x. Epub 2012 May 25. Contact Dermatitis. 2012. PMID: 22624827
BACKGROUND: It is known that, in vitro, human skin bacteria are able to split disperse azo dyes into the corresponding aromatic amines, some of which are sensitizers in the local lymph node assay. ...These molecules penetrate the …
BACKGROUND: It is known that, in vitro, human skin bacteria are able to split disperse azo dyes into the …
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