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2004 1
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2020 0
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Is voice processing species-specific in human auditory cortex? An fMRI study.
Fecteau S, Armony JL, Joanette Y, Belin P. Fecteau S, et al. Neuroimage. 2004 Nov;23(3):840-8. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2004.09.019. Neuroimage. 2004. PMID: 15528084 Clinical Trial.
Recent studies suggested a sensitivity of regions of the human superior temporal sulcus (STS) to the sound of the human voice. ...Animal vocalizations, compared to nonvocal sounds, elicited a more restricted left STS activation, although this region re …
Recent studies suggested a sensitivity of regions of the human superior temporal sulcus (STS) to the sound of the human
Left auditory cortex and amygdala, but right insula dominance for human laughing and crying.
Sander K, Scheich H. Sander K, et al. J Cogn Neurosci. 2005 Oct;17(10):1519-31. doi: 10.1162/089892905774597227. J Cogn Neurosci. 2005. PMID: 16269094
This leaves open the question of hemispheric processing of universal (species-specific) human vocalizations that are more directly comparable to animal vocalizations. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study a …
This leaves open the question of hemispheric processing of universal (species-specific) human vocalizations that …
Communication and the primate brain: insights from neuroimaging studies in humans, chimpanzees and macaques.
Wilson B, Petkov CI. Wilson B, et al. Hum Biol. 2011 Apr;83(2):175-89. doi: 10.3378/027.083.0203. Hum Biol. 2011. PMID: 21615285 Free PMC article.
Considerable knowledge is available on the neural substrates for speech and language from brain-imaging studies in humans, but until recently there was a lack of data for comparison from other animal species on the evolutionarily conserved brain region …
Considerable knowledge is available on the neural substrates for speech and language from brain-imaging studies in humans
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