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Precooling methods and their effects on athletic performance : a systematic review and practical applications.
Ross M, Abbiss C, Laursen P, Martin D, Burke L. Ross M, et al. Among authors: laursen p. Sports Med. 2013 Mar;43(3):207-25. doi: 10.1007/s40279-012-0014-9. Sports Med. 2013. PMID: 23329610 Review.
Factors affecting performance in an ultraendurance triathlon.
Laursen PB, Rhodes EC. Laursen PB, et al. Sports Med. 2001;31(3):195-209. doi: 10.2165/00007256-200131030-00004. Sports Med. 2001. PMID: 11286356 Review.
The scientific basis for high-intensity interval training: optimising training programmes and maximising performance in highly trained endurance athletes.
Laursen PB, Jenkins DG. Laursen PB, et al. Sports Med. 2002;32(1):53-73. doi: 10.2165/00007256-200232010-00003. Sports Med. 2002. PMID: 11772161 Review.
The limited research which has examined changes in muscle enzyme activity in highly trained athletes, following HIT, has revealed no change in oxidative or glycolytic enzyme activity, despite significant improvements in endurance performance (p < 0.05). ...
The limited research which has examined changes in muscle enzyme activity in highly trained athletes, following HIT, has revealed no change …
Interval training program optimization in highly trained endurance cyclists.
Laursen PB, Shing CM, Peake JM, Coombes JS, Jenkins DG. Laursen PB, et al. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2002 Nov;34(11):1801-7. doi: 10.1097/00005768-200211000-00017. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2002. PMID: 12439086 Clinical Trial.
Subjects were matched and assigned to one of four training groups (G(2), N = 8, 8 x 60% T(max) at P(max), 1:2 work:recovery ratio; G(2), N = 9, 8 x 60% T(max) at P(max), recovery at 65% HR(max); G(3), N = 10, 12 x 30 s at 175% PPO, 4.5-min recovery; G(CON), N = 11). …
Subjects were matched and assigned to one of four training groups (G(2), N = 8, 8 x 60% T(max) at P(max), 1:2 work:recovery ratio; G( …
A comparison of the cycling performance of cyclists and triathletes.
Laursen PB, Shing CM, Tennant SC, Prentice CM, Jenkins DG. Laursen PB, et al. J Sports Sci. 2003 May;21(5):411-8. doi: 10.1080/0264041031000071155. J Sports Sci. 2003. PMID: 12800863 Clinical Trial.

However, the cyclists had a significantly faster time to complete the 40-km time-trial (56:18 +/- 2:31 min:s; mean +/- s) than the triathletes (58:57 +/- 3:06 min:s; P < 0.01), which could be partially explained (r = 0.34-0.51; P < 0.05) by a significantly hig

However, the cyclists had a significantly faster time to complete the 40-km time-trial (56:18 +/- 2:31 min:s; mean +/- s) than the triathlet …
Reproducibility of a laboratory-based 40-km cycle time-trial on a stationary wind-trainer in highly trained cyclists.
Laursen PB, Shing CM, Jenkins DG. Laursen PB, et al. Int J Sports Med. 2003 Oct;24(7):481-5. doi: 10.1055/s-2003-42012. Int J Sports Med. 2003. PMID: 12968204

Performance on the second and third 40-km time-trials were highly related (r = 0.96; p < 0.001), not significantly different (57 : 21 +/- 2 : 57 vs. 57 : 12 +/- 3 : 14 min:s), and displayed a low coefficient of variation (CV) = 0.9 +/- 0.7 %. Although the first 40-km ti

Performance on the second and third 40-km time-trials were highly related (r = 0.96; p < 0.001), not significantly different (57 :

Exercise-induced arterial hypoxemia is not different during cycling and running in triathletes.
Laursen PB, Rhodes EC, Langill RH, Taunton JE, McKenzie DC. Laursen PB, et al. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2005 Apr;15(2):113-7. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0838.2004.00391.x. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2005. PMID: 15773866
At maximal exercise, the respiratory exchange ratio (1.15+/-0.06 vs. 1.10+/-0.05) and the ventilatory equivalent for oxygen uptake (37.6+/-3.8 vs. 34.2+/-2.7) were greater during cycling vs. running (P<0.05). ...During submaximal exercise, the V(E)/VCO(2) was less for c …
At maximal exercise, the respiratory exchange ratio (1.15+/-0.06 vs. 1.10+/-0.05) and the ventilatory equivalent for oxygen uptake (37.6+/-3 …
Models to explain fatigue during prolonged endurance cycling.
Abbiss CR, Laursen PB. Abbiss CR, et al. Among authors: laursen pb. Sports Med. 2005;35(10):865-98. doi: 10.2165/00007256-200535100-00004. Sports Med. 2005. PMID: 16180946 Review.
Relationship between laboratory-measured variables and heart rate during an ultra-endurance triathlon.
Laursen PB, Knez WL, Shing CM, Langill RH, Rhodes EC, Jenkins DG. Laursen PB, et al. J Sports Sci. 2005 Oct;23(10):1111-20. doi: 10.1080/02640410400023209. J Sports Sci. 2005. PMID: 16194987

However, mean heart rate during the cycle and run phases of the ultra-endurance triathlon were significantly related to (r = 0.76 and 0.66; P < 0.01), and not significantly different from, the first ventilatory thresholds (146 +/- 12 and 148 +/- 15 beats x min(-1) respe

However, mean heart rate during the cycle and run phases of the ultra-endurance triathlon were significantly related to (r = 0.76 and 0.66; …
Core temperature and hydration status during an Ironman triathlon.
Laursen PB, Suriano R, Quod MJ, Lee H, Abbiss CR, Nosaka K, Martin DT, Bishop D. Laursen PB, et al. Br J Sports Med. 2006 Apr;40(4):320-5; discussion 325. doi: 10.1136/bjsm.2005.022426. Br J Sports Med. 2006. PMID: 16556786 Free PMC article.
Body mass significantly declined during the race by 2.3 (1.2) kg (-3.0 (1.5)%; p < 0.05), whereas urine specific gravity significantly increased (1.011 (0.005) to 1.0170 (0.008) g/ml; p < 0.05) and plasma [Na+], [K+], and [Cl-] did not change. ...

Body mass significantly declined during the race by 2.3 (1.2) kg (-3.0 (1.5)%; p < 0.05), whereas urine specific gravity significa

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