The Diuretic Effect in Human Subjects of an Extract of Taraxacum Officinale Folium Over a Single Day

J Altern Complement Med. 2009 Aug;15(8):929-34. doi: 10.1089/acm.2008.0152.

Abstract

Background: Taraxacum officinale (L.) Weber (Asteraceae) has been extensively employed as a diuretic in traditional folk medicine and in modern phytotherapy in Europe, Asia, and the Americas without prior clinical trial substantiation.

Objectives: In this pilot study, a high-quality fresh leaf hydroethanolic extract of the medicinal plant T. officinale (dandelion) was ingested by volunteers to investigate whether an increased urinary frequency and volume would result.

Design: Volume of urinary output and fluid intake were recorded by subjects. Baseline values for urinary frequency and excretion ratio (urination volume:fluid intake) were established 2 days prior to dandelion dosing (8 mL TID) and monitored throughout a 1-day dosing period and 24 hours postdosing.

Results: For the entire population (n = 17) there was a significant (p < 0.05) increase in the frequency of urination in the 5-hour period after the first dose. There was also a significant (p < 0.001) increase in the excretion ratio in the 5-hour period after the second dose of extract. The third dose failed to change any of the measured parameters.

Conclusions: Based on these first human data, T. officinale ethanolic extract shows promise as a diuretic in humans. Further studies are needed to establish the value of this herb for induction of diuresis in human subjects.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Diuresis / drug effects*
  • Diuretics / pharmacology*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Middle Aged
  • Pilot Projects
  • Plant Extracts / administration & dosage
  • Plant Extracts / pharmacology*
  • Plant Leaves
  • Taraxacum*
  • Urination / drug effects*
  • Young Adult

Substances

  • Diuretics
  • Plant Extracts