Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
. 2010 Sep;118(9):1235-42.
doi: 10.1289/ehp.0901480. Epub 2010 May 5.

Low Dose of Some Persistent Organic Pollutants Predicts Type 2 Diabetes: A Nested Case-Control Study

Affiliations
Free PMC article

Low Dose of Some Persistent Organic Pollutants Predicts Type 2 Diabetes: A Nested Case-Control Study

Duk-Hee Lee et al. Environ Health Perspect. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: Low doses of some persistent organic pollutants (POPs) associate cross-sectionally with type 2 diabetes, whereas associations with high POP exposures are inconsistent.

Objectives: We investigated whether several POPs prospectively predict type 2 diabetes within the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) cohort.

Methods: Participants in this nested case-control study were diabetes free in 1987-1988. By 2005-2006, the 90 controls remained free of diabetes, whereas the 90 cases developed diabetes. Using serum collected in 1987-1988, we measured 8 organochlorine pesticides, 22 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (PCBs), and 1 polybrominated biphenyl (PBB). We compared POP concentrations from CARDIA and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 2003-2004. We computed odds ratios (ORs) for incident diabetes using logistic regression analysis.

Results: Chlorinated POPs in CARDIA in 1987-1988 were much higher than corresponding NHANES 2003-2004 concentrations. POPs showed nonlinear associations with diabetes risk. The highest risk was observed in the second quartiles of trans-nonachlor, oxychlordane, mirex, highly chlorinated PCBs, and PBB153-a finding that suggests low-dose effects. We concentrated risk by summing these POPs and isolated very low concentrations of multiple POPs in the lowest sextile of the sum. The adjusted OR in the second sextile vs. the lowest sextile was 5.3 overall and 20.1 for body mass index > or = 30 kg/m2.

Conclusions: Several POPs at low doses similar to current exposure levels may increase diabetes risk, possibly through endocrine disruption. Certain POPs may a play a role in the current epidemic of diabetes, which has been attributed to obesity.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Adjusted ORs and 95% CIs of incident diabetes according to sextiles of the summary measure formed from serum concentrations of all 31 POPs (∑31POPs; A) or 16 selected POPs [∑16POPs; B) (trans-nonachlor + oxychlordane + mirex + PBB153 + 12 PCBs) with ORs ≥ 1.5 in the second quartile in Tables 3 and 4. Lipid-adjusted model, that is, adjusted for age, sex, race, BMI, triglycerides, and total cholesterol at year 2. *Significantly different from 1, p < 0.05.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Adjusted ORs and 95% CIs of incident diabetes according to sextiles of the summary measure formed from serum concentrations of all 31 POPs (∑31POPs; A, B) or 16 selected POPs (∑16POPs; C, D) (trans-nonachlor + oxychlordane + mirex + PBB153 + 12 PCBs) with ORs ≥ 1.5 in the second quartile in Tables 3 and 4 stratified by year 2 BMI. Lipid-adjusted model, that is, adjusted for age, sex, race, BMI, triglycerides, and total cholesterol at year 2. *Significantly different from 1, p < 0.05.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 100 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

References

    1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey: NHANES 2003–2004. 2010. [[accessed 20 July 2010]]. Available: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes/nhanes2003-2004/nhanes03_04.htm.
    1. Daston GP, Cook JC, Kavlock RJ. Uncertainties for endocrine disrupters: our view on progress. Toxicol Sci. 2003;74(2):245–252. - PubMed
    1. Friedman GD, Cutter GR, Donahue RP, Hughes GH, Hulley SB, Jacobs DR, Jr, et al. CARDIA: study design, recruitment, and some characteristics of the examined subjects. J Clin Epidemiol. 1988;41(11):1105–1116. - PubMed
    1. Henriksen GL, Ketchum NS, Michalek JE, Swaby JA. Serum dioxin and diabetes mellitus in veterans of Operation Ranch Hand. Epidemiology. 1997;8(3):252–258. - PubMed
    1. Howard BV. Insulin resistance and lipid metabolism. Am J Cardiol. 1999;84(1A):28J–32J. - PubMed

Publication types

Feedback